VA Vocational Rehabilitation

Radio Broadcasting School for Veterans

If you are a disabled vet, discover how to:

radio-training-veterans
  • Apply for this program and get financial aid.
  • Apprentice with a professional, at a station near you.
  • Develop your skills with hands-on experience.
  • Get a job in broadcasting.

Let the VA Vocational Rehabilitation Program Pay Your Way into On-Air Radio Broadcasting

Under the VA’s Vocational Rehab Program, disabled vets can train for a new career as an on-air broadcaster. But be sure to pick the program that puts you on the inside track to landing a job.

Disabled veterans, if you’ve ever dreamed of a career in on-air broadcasting, you’ve got an uncle willing to pay to make that dream happen.

[bctt tweet=”The VA is now paying for disabled vets to train for a career in broadcasting.”]It’s your Uncle Sam, operating through the Veterans Administration Vocational Rehabilitation and Retraining Program. The VA vocational rehab program will pay for tuition, books, supplies and other costs of a training program for your new career as an on-air broadcaster. So your cost is little to nothing.

And there’s never been a better time for a vet to pursue a career as a radio DJ, sportscaster, newscaster, or talk show host.

More and more employers realize the value of your military experience. As former VA head, retired General Eric Shinseki said, “Veterans are among the most capable people I’ve run into.” He added that employers value “their skills, their discipline and their motivation.”

Radio Industry Pushing Vet Hiring

The radio industry especially sees the value in hiring vets. The world’s largest radio broadcaster, formerly known as Clear Channel Communications and now iHeart Media, which owns 1,200 U.S. stations, has run a program called “Show Your Stripes,” promoting the hiring of veterans.

They spent some $75 million dollars in a single year publicizing the idea. Vets have been highly successful in radio. There’s even a Veterans Radio Network.

Also, as a vet, you have another advantage. Many businesses now provide disabled vets with preferred status in hiring.